[ Elizabeth Hay] õ All Things Consoled: A daughter's memoir [young-adult-paranormal PDF] Ebook Epub Download õ g-couture.co.uk

[ Elizabeth Hay] õ All Things Consoled: A daughter's memoir [young-adult-paranormal PDF] Ebook Epub Download õ This writing sounds like Bells of truth, both difficult and wonderful moments in every family s long lifeI couldn t put it down Thanks, Elizabeth Hay Every family can be found somewhere in your family, I believe Your book embraces us all.
What can I say I immediately wanted to read another of Elisabeth Hay s books And write the story of my own parents.
So many people are scared of dying, of the process, of the unknown Butt this book shows a couple who have lived a full life and accepting death, and a family willing to accommodate their wishes and enjoy them to the end.
About love, caring and tribulations.
An honest depiction of family dynamics Not an easy task to be honest.
Enjoyed reading it Nothing to add, This writing sounds like Bells of truth, both difficult and wonderful moments in every family s long lifeI couldn t put it down Thanks, Elizabeth Hay Every family can be found somewhere in your family, I believe Your book embraces us all.
What can I say I immediately wanted to read another of Elisabeth Hay s books And write the story of my own parents.
So many people are scared of dying, of the process, of the unknown Butt this book shows a couple who have lived a full life and accepting death, and a family willing to accommodate their wishes and enjoy them to the end.
About love, caring and tribulations.
An honest depiction of family dynamics Not an easy task to be honest.
Enjoyed reading it Nothing to add, Excellent read A keeper on my bookshelf Intend to read of the author s books.
From Elizabeth Hay, one of Canada s beloved novelists, comes a startling and beautiful memoir about the drama of her parents end, and the longer drama of being their daughter Winner of the 2018 Hilary Weston Writers Trust Prize for Nonficiton.
Jean and Gordon Hay were a colourful, formidable pair Jean, a late blooming artist with a marvellous sense of humour, was superlatively frugal nothing got wasted, not even maggoty soup Gordon was a proud and ambitious schoolteacher with a terrifying temper, a deep streak of melancholy, and a devotion to flowers, cars, words, and his wife As old age collides with the tragedy of living too long, these once ferociously independent parents becomeincreasingly dependent on Lizzie, the so called difficult child By looking after them in their final decline, she hopes to prove that she can be a good daughter after all In this courageous memoir, written with tough minded candour, tenderness, and wit, Elizabeth Hay lays bare the exquisite agony of a family s dynamics entrenched favouritism, sibling rivalries, grievances that last for decades, genuine admiration, and enduring love In the end, she reaches a complete understanding of the mostunforgettable characters she will ever know, the vivid giants in her life who were her parents.
Very honest personal account, engaging, a pleasure to read Elizabeth Hay s ALL THINGS CONSOLED is a book that simply will not let go of me I stayed up reading it into the wee hours last week, and it continues to haunt me, to invade my thoughts, dreams and consciousness There are probably a lot of reasons for this It s a book about witnessing the last years of your parents, a close look at the ravages of extreme age, how, in the last years of life, you are robbed of so many things, and not just physical strength, but sometimes your very ability to think, to recall, to remember If you are of a certain age, and especially if you have lost your parents, you will most certainly be caught up in Hay s book, subtitled A DAUGHTER S MEMOIR I am probably a bit older than Hay, but I still recall vividly the last days and death of my dad, thirty years ago this year My mother lived much longer, another twenty four years, and lived her last year and a half in a nearby nursing home Those are months that I often revisit, racked by guilt, filled with sadness, questioning over and over again whether I did the right thing Six years ago now So there is that And we have also been attending too many funerals lately A dear friend s mother died only yesterday, and last night my dreams were filled with thoughts of her, and of my own parents, and yes, of Elizabeth Hay s wrenchingly honest and moving story of her parents decline and final days All of these things mixed together last night Her story will not let go of me.
The book s title comes from something her mother said near the end of her life, as she sank gradually into dementia, losing words, confusing them, losing herself, albeit with occasional moments of lucidity I m lost, she said one day, weeping And, on another day, she said, quite simply, I ve had a good life, all things consoled Hay s father, Gordon, was a teacher and principal in Ontario s public schools for all of his professional life Her mother was an aspiring artist, a painter Hay s own relationship with her father was a troubled one, in many ways She recalls, with brutal honesty, episodes in which her father erupted in fits of anger and disciplined her and her two older brothers quite brutally In one such event, he threw her brother against an iron radiator splitting his head open A doctor was called in for this unfortunate accident In another, she recalls her father dragging her across a room by the hair Hay s mother always made excuses for these kind of things, telling her children that he didn t mean it Some readers might find this inexcusable, but I recall this time in history, when wives always supported their husbands I also recall physical disciplining from my father, of my brothers and me We all do And yet, like Hay, we still loved our dad When you are a child, your parents are like the sun and the moon They are the arbiters of right and wrong So yeah, a troubled relationship And yet, in those last years of her father s life, as she recalls to a friend how much hatred I had felt for him over the years But we get along now, I said All I had to do was kiss him Give him affection The affection I never gave him and that he was so hungry for I had seen the effect on my father of receiving a kiss from me He softened visibly, melted a bit every time So I made a conscious decision to always kiss him as soon as I arrived for a visit and again before I left A kiss That simple In his later years, Hay s father also tells of how his own father didn t think much of him, but then also says he didn t think much of his father either Reading this, I was immediately reminded of Robert Anderson s play and later a movie , I NEVER SANG FOR MY FATHER, which touched me so deeply many years ago, reminding me how much I longed for my own father s approval and respect As did Hay long for her father s respect, but, she tells us, he never even once acknowledged her success as an author, and probably didn t even read her books, a disappointment she still feels, I am sure.
Hay s relationship with her mother was much better, so it was especially painful for her to watch as dementia took her mother s mind away My mom was lucid to the end of her nearly 97 years, but I always knew she loved me Not so sure about my dad, so I was the family weeper at his funeral Not so at my mom s 24 years later Unbearable sadness, but nary a tear.
One other passage that especially grabbed me was something Hay s mother said near the end of her father s life, telling her granddaughter Sochi, He s not long for this land I ve never watched someone die before I m going to stay right here Reading this, I recalled a letter my mother wrote after Dad died, describing his last moments, his last breaths, and I was surprised when she told me she d never seen anyone die before, and how peaceful it was, and how she didn t call anyone, how she just sat with him for a while, and how absolutely quiet it suddenly seemed.
Okay Enough Looking this over, I can see it s not so much a book review as it is a reaction a very personal, emotional and visceral reaction to Elizabeth Hay s story And it s not a stretch either to say I feel consoled Consoled at knowing I am not alone in my continuing thoughts about my own parents, and how important they were to me I hope that Hay herself feels this same sense of consolation, having finally gotten it all down, and in such an eloquent and moving fashion Thank you so much, Elizabeth My very highest recommendation for this thoughtful, loving and beautiful book Tim Bazzett, author of the memoir, BOOKLOVER

Intend to read of the author s books.
Excellent read A keeper on my bookshelf Very honest personal account, engaging, a pleasure to read Elizabeth Hay s ALL THINGS CONSOLED is a book that simply will not let go of me I stayed up reading it into the wee hours last week, and it continues to haunt me, to invade my thoughts, dreams and consciousness There are probably a lot of reasons for this It s a book about witnessing the last years of your parents, a close look at the ravages of extreme age, how, in the last years of life, you are robbed of so many things, and not just physical strength, but sometimes your very ability to think, to recall, to remember If you are of a certain age, and especially if you have lost your parents, you will most certainly be caught up in Hay s book, subtitled A DAUGHTER S MEMOIR I am probably a bit older than Hay, but I still recall vividly the last days and death of my dad, thirty years ago this year My mother lived much longer, another twenty four years, and lived her last year and a half in a nearby nursing home Those are months that I often revisit, racked by guilt, filled with sadness, questioning over and over again whether I did the right thing Six years ago now So there is that And we have also been attending too many funerals lately A dear friend s mother died only yesterday, and last night my dreams were filled with thoughts of her, and of my own parents, and yes, of Elizabeth Hay s wrenchingly honest and moving story of her parents decline and final days All of these things mixed together last night Her story will not let go of me.
The book s title comes from something her mother said near the end of her life, as she sank gradually into dementia, losing words, confusing them, losing herself, albeit with occasional moments of lucidity I m lost, she said one day, weeping And, on another day, she said, quite simply, I ve had a good life, all things consoled Hay s father, Gordon, was a teacher and principal in Ontario s public schools for all of his professional life Her mother was an aspiring artist, a painter Hay s own relationship with her father was a troubled one, in many ways She recalls, with brutal honesty, episodes in which her father erupted in fits of anger and disciplined her and her two older brothers quite brutally In one such event, he threw her brother against an iron radiator splitting his head open A doctor was called in for this unfortunate accident In another, she recalls her father dragging her across a room by the hair Hay s mother always made excuses for these kind of things, telling her children that he didn t mean it Some readers might find this inexcusable, but I recall this time in history, when wives always supported their husbands I also recall physical disciplining from my father, of my brothers and me We all do And yet, like Hay, we still loved our dad When you are a child, your parents are like the sun and the moon They are the arbiters of right and wrong So yeah, a troubled relationship And yet, in those last years of her father s life, as she recalls to a friend how much hatred I had felt for him over the years But we get along now, I said All I had to do was kiss him Give him affection The affection I never gave him and that he was so hungry for I had seen the effect on my father of receiving a kiss from me He softened visibly, melted a bit every time So I made a conscious decision to always kiss him as soon as I arrived for a visit and again before I left A kiss That simple In his later years, Hay s father also tells of how his own father didn t think much of him, but then also says he didn t think much of his father either Reading this, I was immediately reminded of Robert Anderson s play and later a movie , I NEVER SANG FOR MY FATHER, which touched me so deeply many years ago, reminding me how much I longed for my own father s approval and respect As did Hay long for her father s respect, but, she tells us, he never even once acknowledged her success as an author, and probably didn t even read her books, a disappointment she still feels, I am sure.
Hay s relationship with her mother was much better, so it was especially painful for her to watch as dementia took her mother s mind away My mom was lucid to the end of her nearly 97 years, but I always knew she loved me Not so sure about my dad, so I was the family weeper at his funeral Not so at my mom s 24 years later Unbearable sadness, but nary a tear.
One other passage that especially grabbed me was something Hay s mother said near the end of her father s life, telling her granddaughter Sochi, He s not long for this land I ve never watched someone die before I m going to stay right here Reading this, I recalled a letter my mother wrote after Dad died, describing his last moments, his last breaths, and I was surprised when she told me she d never seen anyone die before, and how peaceful it was, and how she didn t call anyone, how she just sat with him for a while, and how absolutely quiet it suddenly seemed.
Okay Enough Looking this over, I can see it s not so much a book review as it is a reaction a very personal, emotional and visceral reaction to Elizabeth Hay s story And it s not a stretch either to say I feel consoled Consoled at knowing I am not alone in my continuing thoughts about my own parents, and how important they were to me I hope that Hay herself feels this same sense of consolation, having finally gotten it all down, and in such an eloquent and moving fashion Thank you so much, Elizabeth My very highest recommendation for this thoughtful, loving and beautiful book Tim Bazzett, author of the memoir, BOOKLOVER