ó Satires. Epistles. The Art of Poetry ↠´ Download by Ï Horace

ó Satires. Epistles. The Art of Poetry ↠´ Download by Ï Horace Horace Quintus Horatius Flaccus, BCE Was Born At Venusia, Son Of A Freedman Clerk Who Had Him Well Educated At Rome And Athens Horace Supported The Ill Fated Killers Of Caesar, Lost His Property, Became A Secretary In The Treasury, And Began To Write Poetry Maecenas, Lover Of Literature, To Whom Virgil And Varius Introduced Horace In , Became His Friend And Made Him Largely Independent By Giving Him A Farm After Horace Knew And Aided With His Pen The Emperor Augustus, Who After Virgil S Death In Engaged Him To Celebrate Imperial Affairs In Poetry Horace Refused To Become Augustus S Private Secretary And Died A Few Months After Maecenas Both Lyric In Various Metres And Other Work In Hexameters Was Spread Over The Period Or BCE It Is Roman In Spirit, Greek In TechniqueIn The Two books Of Satires Horace Is A Moderate Social Critic And Commentator The Two books Of Epistles Are Intimate And Polished, The Second Book Being Literary Criticism As Is Also The Ars Poetica The Epodes In Various Mostly Iambic Metres Are Akin To The Discourses As Horace Called His Satires And Epistles But Also Look Towards The Famous Odes, In Four books, In The Old Greek Lyric Metres Used With Much Skill Some Are National Odes About Public Affairs Some Are Pleasant Poems Of Love And Wine Some Are Moral Letters All Have A Rare Perfection The Loeb Classical Library Edition Of The Odes And Epodes Is In Volume Number impeccable everything all right No one can be that presumptuous All one can review is the translator, who is a little bit loose I prefer translators that are literal But then, as Robert Frost said, poetry is that thing that gets lost in translation, if you know enough Latin, the original text can be appreciated in full And Horace is one who gives you plenty of quotations, if you wish to impress your friends In just the few pages of Ars Poetica, you have in medias res, laudatur temporis acti, quandoque bonus dormitat Homerus Thanks to the translator for telling us that morbus regius was jaundice and that it was considered contagious, like scabies Can you imagine It took another 2,000 years to figure out that jaundice is caused by a contagious hepatatis virus.
everything all right Though this is not necessarily a book for the idle poetry reader, I loved this completely If you enjoy reading the work of the ancient poets and writers, this is perfect Since it has the original Latin text on the facing page to the translation, it is possible to see how the syntax and lines fit together to make the beautiful, if a bit idiosyncratic, poetry of Horace.
No one can be that presumptuous All one can review is the translator, who is a little bit loose I prefer translators that are literal But then, as Robert Frost said, poetry is that thing that gets lost in translation, if you know enough Latin, the original text can be appreciated in full And Horace is one who gives you plenty of quotations, if you wish to impress your friends In just the few pages of Ars Poetica, you have in medias res, laudatur temporis acti, quandoque bonus dormitat Homerus Thanks to the translator for telling us that morbus regius was jaundice and that it was considered contagious, like scabies Can you imagine It took another 2,000 years to figure out that jaundice is caused by a contagious hepatatis virus.
Though this is not necessarily a book for the idle poetry reader, I loved this completely If you enjoy reading the work of the ancient poets and writers, this is perfect Since it has the original Latin text on the facing page to the translation, it is possible to see how the syntax and lines fit together to make the beautiful, if a bit idiosyncratic, poetry of Horace.