Trailer ñ The Story of Silver: How the White Metal Shaped America and the Modern World PDF by ñ William L. Silber g-couture.co.uk

Trailer ñ The Story of Silver: How the White Metal Shaped America and the Modern World PDF by ñ William L. Silber Der Autor beschreibt ausf hrlich die Rolle von Silber als W hrungsmetall in der Geschichte der USA Er l sst kaum Fragen offen Das Buch ist ist in einem exzellenten Stil geschrieben und auch durchaus unterhaltsam zu lesen Einigerma en gut Englisch sollte man aber k nnen.
Um das Fazit vorweg zu nehmen Der Bimetallismus ein von Silber und Gold gedeckter US Dollar ist schon etwa 150 Jahre vorbei Silber war nur in systemischen Krisen ein gutes, dann aber auch sehr gutes Investment Ende der 1970er Jahre, als nach dem Zerbrechen des Systems von Bretton Woods der Dollar in Gefahr war Und seit 2003 bzw 2008 2011, als die Spekulationsblasen immer gr er wurden und am Ende das Weltfinanzsystem am Abgrund stand.
Gold hat im Juni 2019 seine 2011 begonnene Korrekturphase beendet Auch der Silberpreis, der dem Goldpreis immer hinterher l uft, d rfte demn chst wieder st rker steigen Insofern das richtige Buch zur richtigen Zeit Empfehlenswert Silver always seems to pale next to gold at best silver is a lining, but never a fever and it is always, almost non chalantly, at hand, either as currency or cutlery And yet, it intersects our lives in peculiar ways My father in law used to tell dramatic stories of inflation in China and my mother in law of how the imperial Japanese invaded their country I remember my grandfather s stash of old silver dollars in his rural drugstore, and reading about silver and the Hunt brothers in the dark days of inflation in the late 1970s not to mention learning about William Jennings Bryan historic crusade for stabilizing the US dollar In this fascinating history, William Silber explains how one precious metal underlies all these events Those with an interest in history or in commodities will find this book a great read and one that shows how following a subject, thoughtfully and with detail, from a particular frame of reference can open up new ways of seeing the world Highly recommended.
I read the same history books you did, which briefly touched upon the Cross of Gold of the late 1800 s, the silver versus gold lobby, and the Great Depression confiscation of gold I ve lived though the disappearance of silver coins as we prepared to go to the moon and of course the scandal of the Hunt brothers cornering the silver market in the early 80 s.
Most historical accounts are abbreviated gibberish, because the writers have no idea what they are writing about.
Alas, The Story of Silver not only is written by someone who knows what they are talking about, Mr Silber also provides the historical context of what was going on He adds just enough history and context to render each chapter to be a captivating episode in our nation s history.
I think a general reader will appreciate this book, although they might breeze through a few of the chapters that are of interest to a silver bug But for any current or ex coin collector, bullion investor, financial historian or even someone who likes history, this is worthwhile I finished it in less than 3 days that tells me it held my interest.
And sometime in the month after you read it, you will be able to drop the phrase, The Crime of 1873 in a conversation with your banker friend s , express shock they have no idea what you are referring to, and cleverly force them to buy drinks after your claim is google verified It s like a price rebate guarantee What s not to like Final note, you will wonder why, if your old text books were so woefully inadequate regarding the Cross of Gold and Williams Jennings Bryant, then what else did they completely mangle As a retired Foreign Service Officer, economist, and numismatist I find Dr Silber s book, The Story of Silver, fascinating and educational It s reminiscent of an interdisciplinary approach to economics used by Walter Rostow used at UT Austin while I was a graduate student there several decades ago In an age of fiat money, and now, even digital currency, one forgets that for a millennium and a half, gold and silver played a prominent role in the evolution of money as we know it today.
As economists, we often have a tendency to quantify things like supply and demand of a given commodity or service in an effort to find price equilibrium Dr Silber shows us there is another dimension when it comes to the white metal, the interplay of market forces with varied national interests, policy objectives, institutional machinations, and even personality clashes As a retired Foreign Service Officer, with over 30 years experience in nine countries, I have an appreciation for the dynamics of these moving parts.
I am old enough to have witnessed the spiraling price movements of silver in the late 1970 s and 2009 and the havoc it played on the numismatic community The Story of Silver fills in a lot of historical cracks in the lore of silver these last two centuries Written for the layman, the book is an easy read, laced with the occasional wry comment as the author navigates what could be a rather dull subject for many If you really want to know what happened to silver and the role it played in our economy and history, this is the book to read.
Der Autor beschreibt ausf hrlich die Rolle von Silber als W hrungsmetall in der Geschichte der USA Er l sst kaum Fragen offen Das Buch ist ist in einem exzellenten Stil geschrieben und auch durchaus unterhaltsam zu lesen Einigerma en gut Englisch sollte man aber k nnen.
Um das Fazit vorweg zu nehmen Der Bimetallismus ein von Silber und Gold gedeckter US Dollar ist schon etwa 150 Jahre vorbei Silber war nur in systemischen Krisen ein gutes, dann aber auch sehr gutes Investment Ende der 1970er Jahre, als nach dem Zerbrechen des Systems von Bretton Woods der Dollar in Gefahr war Und seit 2003 bzw 2008 2011, als die Spekulationsblasen immer gr er wurden und am Ende das Weltfinanzsystem am Abgrund stand.
Gold hat im Juni 2019 seine 2011 begonnene Korrekturphase beendet Auch der Silberpreis, der dem Goldpreis immer hinterher l uft, d rfte demn chst wieder st rker steigen Insofern das richtige Buch zur richtigen Zeit Empfehlenswert Silver always seems to pale next to gold at best silver is a lining, but never a fever and it is always, almost non chalantly, at hand, either as currency or cutlery And yet, it intersects our lives in peculiar ways My father in law used to tell dramatic stories of inflation in China and my mother in law of how the imperial Japanese invaded their country I remember my grandfather s stash of old silver dollars in his rural drugstore, and reading about silver and the Hunt brothers in the dark days of inflation in the late 1970s not to mention learning about William Jennings Bryan historic crusade for stabilizing the US dollar In this fascinating history, William Silber explains how one precious metal underlies all these events Those with an interest in history or in commodities will find this book a great read and one that shows how following a subject, thoughtfully and with detail, from a particular frame of reference can open up new ways of seeing the world Highly recommended.
I read the same history books you did, which briefly touched upon the Cross of Gold of the late 1800 s, the silver versus gold lobby, and the Great Depression confiscation of gold I ve lived though the disappearance of silver coins as we prepared to go to the moon and of course the scandal of the Hunt brothers cornering the silver market in the early 80 s.
Most historical accounts are abbreviated gibberish, because the writers have no idea what they are writing about.
Alas, The Story of Silver not only is written by someone who knows what they are talking about, Mr Silber also provides the historical context of what was going on He adds just enough history and context to render each chapter to be a captivating episode in our nation s history.
I think a general reader will appreciate this book, although they might breeze through a few of the chapters that are of interest to a silver bug But for any current or ex coin collector, bullion investor, financial historian or even someone who likes history, this is worthwhile I finished it in less than 3 days that tells me it held my interest.
And sometime in the month after you read it, you will be able to drop the phrase, The Crime of 1873 in a conversation with your banker friend s , express shock they have no idea what you are referring to, and cleverly force them to buy drinks after your claim is google verified It s like a price rebate guarantee What s not to like Final note, you will wonder why, if your old text books were so woefully inadequate regarding the Cross of Gold and Williams Jennings Bryant, then what else did they completely mangle As a retired Foreign Service Officer, economist, and numismatist I find Dr Silber s book, The Story of Silver, fascinating and educational It s reminiscent of an interdisciplinary approach to economics used by Walter Rostow used at UT Austin while I was a graduate student there several decades ago In an age of fiat money, and now, even digital currency, one forgets that for a millennium and a half, gold and silver played a prominent role in the evolution of money as we know it today.
As economists, we often have a tendency to quantify things like supply and demand of a given commodity or service in an effort to find price equilibrium Dr Silber shows us there is another dimension when it comes to the white metal, the interplay of market forces with varied national interests, policy objectives, institutional machinations, and even personality clashes As a retired Foreign Service Officer, with over 30 years experience in nine countries, I have an appreciation for the dynamics of these moving parts.
I am old enough to have witnessed the spiraling price movements of silver in the late 1970 s and 2009 and the havoc it played on the numismatic community The Story of Silver fills in a lot of historical cracks in the lore of silver these last two centuries Written for the layman, the book is an easy read, laced with the occasional wry comment as the author navigates what could be a rather dull subject for many If you really want to know what happened to silver and the role it played in our economy and history, this is the book to read.
The story of silver, this ain t.
It s the story of the Hunt brothers squeeze, with a 100 page introduction about the crime of 1873, when silver was demonetized, William Jennings Bryan s Cross of Gold crusade to reintroduce bimetallism, FDR s attempted ramp with Pittman and Morgenthau, and some rather desperate conspiracy theory material regarding JFK.
The author should have left all that stuff out and should have concentrated on the Hunt brothers and perhaps their nemesis, Henry Jarecki That story is told rather well Also, I happen to share William Silber s sympathy for the Hunt brothers and I m happy somebody chose to stand up for them And for a Salomon alumnus like me it was fun to read about Engelhardt and Philipp Brothers.
In short, this is not a bad book, but Silber fails to reach the heights attained with his previous effort, his tremendous Volcker biography from some seven years ago.
I always enjoy creative perspectives on history and this book does not disappoint Silber tells the story of silver and events involved around it He starts from the beginning of the American republic with various opinions on the metal from people such as Alexander Hamilton, continues through William Jennings Bryan famous speech at the Democratic National Convention, spends a lot of time with the Hunts as would be expected and ends with current prognostications, including Warren Buffett s venture into the metal.
He explains silver s unique role as both a metal used for practical purposes as well as a store of value Historically this led a few times to people exchanging their silver items for cash as the price increased, further increasing the price While everyone is familiar with the metal, this book will surprise the reader with how many significant events on the world stage involved the metal.
The most interesting part of the book is the subject most people probably first think of when seeing this book the Hunt brothers and their fascination with the metal I never knew too much about the episode, but always thought the Hunts were a wealthy oil family and the brothers tried to corner the market and ended up in bankruptcy While this covers the gist of it, Silber provides many fascinating aspects of the story I had no idea that the government basically changed the rules midstream in order to fight off the buying frenzy and the role the government had in their bankruptcy.
Highly recommend this easy read on a common topic presented in a unique manner.
How Silver Influenced Two Hundred Years Of World History, And Why It Matters TodayThis Is The Story Of Silver S Transformation From Soft Money During The Nineteenth Century To Hard Asset Today, And How Manipulations Of The White Metal By American President Franklin D Roosevelt During The S And By The Richest Man In The World, Texas Oil Baron Nelson Bunker Hunt, During The S Altered The Course Of American And World History FDR Pumped Up The Price Of Silver To Help Jump Start The US Economy During The Great Depression, But This Move Weakened China, Which Was Then On The Silver Standard, And Facilitated Japan S Rise To Power Before World War II Bunker Hunt Went On A Silver Buying Spree During The S To Protect Himself Against Inflation And Triggered A Financial Crisis That Left Him BankruptSilver Has Been The Preferred Shelter Against Government Defaults, Political Instability, And Inflation For Most People In The World Because It Is Cheaper Than Gold The White Metal Has Been The Place To Hide When Conventional Investments Sour, But It Has Also Seduced Sophisticated Investors Throughout The Ages Like A Siren This Book Explains How Powerful Figures, Up To And Including Warren Buffett, Have Come Under Silver S Thrall, And How Its History Guides Economic And Political Decisions In The Twenty First Century N.
Y.
U Economic historian William Silber has a real fondness for silver as a monetary metal He starts his story in ancient times but his history really begins with Alexander Hamilton establishing a bi metal standard in 1793 valuing silver at 1 16th of an ounce of gold, creating the 16 1 gold silver ratio that would legally stand until 1873 That standard valued silver at 1.
29 ounce.
He is not happy about the Crime of 1873 where Senator John Sherman demonetizes silver and puts the United States on the road to the gold standard which occurs in 1879 By using the then populist slogan, he puts himself squarely on the of the pro silver pro inflation forces extant in the country at the time Unfortunately Silber fails to distinguish between a good deflation caused by rapid increases in productivity and a bad deflation distinguished by a collapse in aggregate demand The 19th Century silver wars culminate with William Jennings Bryan s Cross of Gold speech at the 1896 Democratic Convention By then gold becomes plentiful and the U.
S enjoys the full benefits of the gold standard.
One of Silber s heroes is Nevada Senator Key Pitman who leads the silver bloc in the Senate which counted fourteen senators among the seven mining states In the 1930s Pitman convinces Roosevelt to raise the price of silver through huge treasury purchases That ripples across the Pacific breaking China, then on the silver standard, leading to a flood of illegal exports that cause a credit contraction thereby weakening the economy That in turn will make it easier for first Japan and then Mao s Communists to take over the country.
Silber s most interesting character is Henry Jarecki, a Yale psychiatrist who become enad of silver Jarecki sees that silver is undervalued and buys up as much coin and silver certificate currency to redeem at the U.
S Mint at 1.
29 ounce Soon the mint runs out of silver and the price explodes Jarecki would leave Yale and found Mocatta Metals, a leading precious metals trading company.
Silber spends most of the book in excruciating detail describing the Texas Hunt Brothers corner on the silver market in 1980 An operation that nearly bankrupts Wall Street and triggers Fed action To me, he is way too sympathetic to the Hunt Brothers.
Simply put Silber describes silver as a dual functioning metal It is both an industrial commodity and a store of value He makes his case on the store of value proposition when the price of silver surges with gold amidst the short inflation scare that existed following the financial crisis of 2007 2010 In essence it seems Silber has faith in metals than the fiat currency of the Central Banks.
Though not as good as his earlier books on Paul Volcker and the 1914 closure of the stock market, The Story of Silver is a good read for those interested in economic history.
I ve been in the precious metal business my whole career and thought I knew the history pretty well But there were a number of eye openers, especially the role of silver and US policy regarding China and WWII This book is no doubt a quick, enjoyable and educational read by folks steeped in finance and futures markets, but is not for those who put their money and faith in index mutual funds I felt better about not understanding much of what the author who obviously knows his stuff and is well organized wrote when I got to page 218, reading that in reacting to the 80s crash of the silver futures market and addressing implications for the wider economy, Federal Reserve Chairman Volcker knew little about futures markets It s difficult to humanize the history recounted here, and pasting various mustaches on key figures didn t do much for me Basically, I lacked a feel for the implications of the economic history laid out in this book, though I m of at least average intelligence So, while financial buffs may want to buy this book, I d recommend others borrow it from a public library Maybe I should reread the book, but I just lack the stamina, will, and interest to do so Instead, I ve donated it to my local library, my first time to do so with a fairly expensive book.


I always enjoy creative perspectives on history and this book does not disappoint Silber tells the story of silver and events involved around it He starts from the beginning of the American republic with various opinions on the metal from people such as Alexander Hamilton, continues through William Jennings Bryan famous speech at the Democratic National Convention, spends a lot of time with the Hunts as would be expected and ends with current prognostications, including Warren Buffett s venture into the metal.
He explains silver s unique role as both a metal used for practical purposes as well as a store of value Historically this led a few times to people exchanging their silver items for cash as the price increased, further increasing the price While everyone is familiar with the metal, this book will surprise the reader with how many significant events on the world stage involved the metal.
The most interesting part of the book is the subject most people probably first think of when seeing this book the Hunt brothers and their fascination with the metal I never knew too much about the episode, but always thought the Hunts were a wealthy oil family and the brothers tried to corner the market and ended up in bankruptcy While this covers the gist of it, Silber provides many fascinating aspects of the story I had no idea that the government basically changed the rules midstream in order to fight off the buying frenzy and the role the government had in their bankruptcy.
Highly recommend this easy read on a common topic presented in a unique manner.
The story of silver, this ain t.
It s the story of the Hunt brothers squeeze, with a 100 page introduction about the crime of 1873, when silver was demonetized, William Jennings Bryan s Cross of Gold crusade to reintroduce bimetallism, FDR s attempted ramp with Pittman and Morgenthau, and some rather desperate conspiracy theory material regarding JFK.
The author should have left all that stuff out and should have concentrated on the Hunt brothers and perhaps their nemesis, Henry Jarecki That story is told rather well Also, I happen to share William Silber s sympathy for the Hunt brothers and I m happy somebody chose to stand up for them And for a Salomon alumnus like me it was fun to read about Engelhardt and Philipp Brothers.
In short, this is not a bad book, but Silber fails to reach the heights attained with his previous effort, his tremendous Volcker biography from some seven years ago.
N.
Y.
U Economic historian William Silber has a real fondness for silver as a monetary metal He starts his story in ancient times but his history really begins with Alexander Hamilton establishing a bi metal standard in 1793 valuing silver at 1 16th of an ounce of gold, creating the 16 1 gold silver ratio that would legally stand until 1873 That standard valued silver at 1.
29 ounce.
He is not happy about the Crime of 1873 where Senator John Sherman demonetizes silver and puts the United States on the road to the gold standard which occurs in 1879 By using the then populist slogan, he puts himself squarely on the of the pro silver pro inflation forces extant in the country at the time Unfortunately Silber fails to distinguish between a good deflation caused by rapid increases in productivity and a bad deflation distinguished by a collapse in aggregate demand The 19th Century silver wars culminate with William Jennings Bryan s Cross of Gold speech at the 1896 Democratic Convention By then gold becomes plentiful and the U.
S enjoys the full benefits of the gold standard.
One of Silber s heroes is Nevada Senator Key Pitman who leads the silver bloc in the Senate which counted fourteen senators among the seven mining states In the 1930s Pitman convinces Roosevelt to raise the price of silver through huge treasury purchases That ripples across the Pacific breaking China, then on the silver standard, leading to a flood of illegal exports that cause a credit contraction thereby weakening the economy That in turn will make it easier for first Japan and then Mao s Communists to take over the country.
Silber s most interesting character is Henry Jarecki, a Yale psychiatrist who become enad of silver Jarecki sees that silver is undervalued and buys up as much coin and silver certificate currency to redeem at the U.
S Mint at 1.
29 ounce Soon the mint runs out of silver and the price explodes Jarecki would leave Yale and found Mocatta Metals, a leading precious metals trading company.
Silber spends most of the book in excruciating detail describing the Texas Hunt Brothers corner on the silver market in 1980 An operation that nearly bankrupts Wall Street and triggers Fed action To me, he is way too sympathetic to the Hunt Brothers.
Simply put Silber describes silver as a dual functioning metal It is both an industrial commodity and a store of value He makes his case on the store of value proposition when the price of silver surges with gold amidst the short inflation scare that existed following the financial crisis of 2007 2010 In essence it seems Silber has faith in metals than the fiat currency of the Central Banks.
Though not as good as his earlier books on Paul Volcker and the 1914 closure of the stock market, The Story of Silver is a good read for those interested in economic history.
I ve been in the precious metal business my whole career and thought I knew the history pretty well But there were a number of eye openers, especially the role of silver and US policy regarding China and WWII This book is no doubt a quick, enjoyable and educational read by folks steeped in finance and futures markets, but is not for those who put their money and faith in index mutual funds I felt better about not understanding much of what the author who obviously knows his stuff and is well organized wrote when I got to page 218, reading that in reacting to the 80s crash of the silver futures market and addressing implications for the wider economy, Federal Reserve Chairman Volcker knew little about futures markets It s difficult to humanize the history recounted here, and pasting various mustaches on key figures didn t do much for me Basically, I lacked a feel for the implications of the economic history laid out in this book, though I m of at least average intelligence So, while financial buffs may want to buy this book, I d recommend others borrow it from a public library Maybe I should reread the book, but I just lack the stamina, will, and interest to do so Instead, I ve donated it to my local library, my first time to do so with a fairly expensive book.